Should You File a Homeowners Insurance Claim?

Homeowners’ insurance is designed to protect you from financial ruin when the worst happens to your largest asset. If a plane crashes into your house, it is obvious that your insurance company will need to become involved. However, for less serious losses, should you file a claim? Here, we answer some commonly asked questions on this topic:

Does my policy provide coverage for the damage that occurred?

Perils such as fire, smoke, and explosion are usually covered. Coverage for foundation, water damage or slow seepage will depend on the kind of policy you have. Flooding due to rising waters is never covered in a home insurance policy. If you attempt to file a claim for something that is not covered, you will not only be wasting your time, but you will also end up with a claim against your record. The golden rule is to ask your agent what your policy covers, before making that call to the claims department!

What is a deductible, and how much is mine?

The deductible is the portion of the loss that you pay out of pocket before the insurance steps in to take care of the rest. On your homeowners policy, your deductibles will usually be listed as percentages, or sometimes dollar amounts. Typical deductibles for homeowners insurance in Houston are 2% for wind and hail (including hurricane), and 1% for all other perils. In other words, on a $300,000 home policy, you would pay the first $6,000 of a weather-related claim, and the first $3,000 of all other claims. If you can’t find the numbers on your policy, or if you are unsure, give your agent a call and they will be happy to explain.

It looks like the damage will probably be more than my deductible. What next?

You should get an estimate from a licensed contractor for the total cost of the repairs. In fact, you’ll want to do this anyway, regardless of whether you plan on filing a claim.

So …. the repairs will cost $7,000, and my deductible is $6,000. I’m good to file a claim, right?

Not so fast. All claims, even those where little or no money was actually paid out, will show on your record. Claims often lead to premium increases – particularly if more than one claim is filed over a three or five-year period. If you have a lot of claims, you may even be “non-renewed” by your insurance company, and will have to seek inferior coverage elsewhere. In other words, it may be cheaper in the long run to pay for the damage yourself, even if the repair bill exceeds your deductible. So the best advice is speak to your agent, do the math, and don’t rush to file a claim when something happens.

My house burned to the ground, so should I file a claim?

Of course. Major disasters are what your home insurance is there for. This is the moment you’ll be glad you opted for the Replacement Cost policy, instead of an Actual Cash Value one which depreciates your roof and personal property every year.

My neighbor fell down in my driveway and broke her leg. Should I file a claim?

Yes. You never know when a liability claim can become a full-blown financial and legal disaster, so it is wise to file these kinds of claims as soon as possible.

My old fence finally fell down in last week’s storm. It was due for replacement anyway. Will my homeowners’ insurance cover it?

No. Your side of the bargain with the insurance company is to maintain your home to a reasonable standard, and your homeowners policy is not designed to cover routine maintenance or wear-and-tear issues. This means that any related claims will be denied.

Seven Things Your Home Insurance Policy Really Should Include

 

1. Replacement Cost This means that the insurance company will pay to replace your roof and contents. If your quote does not include the words Replacement Cost, you’ll be stuck with an Actual Cash Value (ACV) policy, which factors in depreciation before paying out on a claim. Memorial Insurance offers only Replacement Cost policies.

 

2. Low deductibles The deductible is the portion of the claim you pay before the insurance company takes care of the rest. Common deductibles are 2% for wind and hail, and 1% for all other perils. Any higher than this, and you’ll be paying a lot of money out of pocket before the insurance kicks in.

 

3. NO policy fees Some insurance agents charge a policy fee to their customers, over and above the commission they already receive from the insurance company. Why pay $150 to your agent to do a job that other agents offer for free? Memorial Insurance never charges policy fees.

 

4. Adequate coverage If your home isn’t insured to the full cost of rebuilding, you are going to find yourself seriously out of pocket in the case of a total loss. Remember that even if you have an older home, the cost to rebuild it will be at 2018 prices, so you’ll want a 2018 insurance policy to match!

 

5. Water backup This is when a blocked drain causes sewage and waste water to back up into your home. Coverage is inexpensive, but not included in a standard home insurance policy, so make sure your insurance agent adds it!

 

6. Reputable company Hopefully you never have to put this to the test, but some carriers routinely outperform others when it comes to paying out on claims. Ask your agent for impartial advice on which carriers are best when the worst happens.

 

7. Flood coverage Protection against flood is not included in any home insurance policy – it must be purchased separately. No home in Houston should be without flood coverage, so ask your agent about purchasing a flood insurance policy today!